• Watch TV and discuss current events with your friends or family.
  • Read Magazines / Newspapers and discuss issues with friends or family.
  • Make links with class work and current events in a log or a blog.
  • Keep a reading log of current events.
  • Collect news items either physically or by making digital links in a portfolio.
  • Share Google Docs from teachers with your parents.
  • Share students’ Google Docs with parents and allow comments.
  • Communicate with local national politicians over issues.
  • Have a look in the newspaper to see what public meetings are being held and which may be topical.
  • Visit Te Papa and Museum of the City and the Sea, as well as the Carter Observatory, Zealandia, and the Petone Settlers Museum.
  • Keep records of weather information.
  • Create quizzes and share with your classmates
  • Investigate your Whakapapa and seek out ‘Family Treasures’
  • Watch Television advertising for information relating to concepts/ideas.
  • Watch parliament in session on TV.
  • Identify bias (one-sidedness) in news coverage or opinion pieces (newspaper, magazine pieces, or shows like Campbell Live, Close Up, Sunday, State of the Nation).
  • Write Letters to the Editor on topical subjects.
  • Read and reply to other Letters to the Editor on topical subjects.
  • Observe the behaviour on buses, malls and classrooms to identify cultural norms of behaviour and how people react when these norms are broken
  • Investigate membership of groups with a conscience (for example Amnesty International, Environmental Group).
  • Investigate alternative modes of transportation or energy & build generators.
  • Investigate the possibility of growing your own vegetables.
  • Plan a comprehensive earthquake tsunami family plan, including what to do if disaster strikes while family members are at work, in town, at friends etc. Check you have a survival kit. Quake safe your home. Find out where the relevant civil defence muster stations are.
  • “Energywise” your home.
  • Tune into morning report on National Radio.
  • Ask your parents “Who would you have to vote for if you had to vote tomorrow and why?” and “Has the party you voted for changed over time and why?”